Home
Radiology Guides Anatomy Physio & Path Medicine Physics Contact
STABILITY OF THE EYE-PREVENTING DOWNWARD DISPLACEMENT

Anatomy-Head

STABILITY OF THE EYE-PREVENTING DOWNWARD DISPLACEMENT

1. The fascial sheath of the eye (Tenon's fascia) provides stability to the eye within the orbit and prevents it from sinking.
2. It is applied like a bursa to the back of the eye, from the corneoscleral junction to the attachment of the optic nerve and prolonged over the recti and obliques.

3. Over the lateral rectus the tubular prolongation is thickened to form the lateral check ligament, which attaches to the marginal tubercle of Whitnall (bony elevation at the orbital surface of the zygomatic bone).
4. Over the medial retcus this prolongation is thickened to form the medial check ligament, which attaches to the posterior lacrimal crest (on the lacrimal bone).

5. B/w these ligaments the inferior part of the sheath is thickened to form the suspensory ligament of Lockwood, which supports the eye within the orbit.
6. The eye does not rest on the orbital floor and is held up (in fact, closer to the roof) by the suspensory ligament.
7. As a result, the whole maxilla can be removed with the medial orbital wall up to the marginal tubercle without descent of the eye.
8. Above this level removal of bone destroys the attachment of the suspensory ligament, hence the eye sinks down, and intolerable diplopia results.


Avatar
REFERENCES

1. Mcminn. (2003). Last's Anatomy. Elsevier Australia. ISBN:0729537528. Read it at Google Books - Find it at Amazon
2. Netter, F. H. (2019). Atlas of human anatomy. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.
3. Image: no reference available.

Ⓒ A. Manickam 2018

+ Home